Quick update:

  • The data table is available (.pdf download); all regional trap counts are within normal limits.
  • The commercial broccoli field at Gervais (GRVS) has been harvested.
  • New traps have been set to detect pests in commercial sweet corn – those counts will be available by next week.
  • **The new “Oregon Pest Monitoring Network” is now available! This collaborative effort between USDA-ARS and OSU provides real-time access to data, including a map of trap locations.
    • To view observations, select the “Pest Observation Dashboard” tab.
    • Use filters to see activity graphs for specific pests or crops.
    • The system also includes a “Report a Pest” function, where growers or reps can inform staff of concerns.
  • If you have noticed a recent reduction of efficacy in the products you use for diamondback moth, please consider taking a short, anonymous survey:

Leafhoppers belong to Hemiptera: Cicadellidae and one of the most well-studied species is the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae Harris. It has been proven (1,2) that these insects are long-range migrants, and tend to colonize an area based on surface airflow convection currents and high and low pressure fronts. Because they can be significant agricultural pests (alfalfa, clover, beans, tomato, potato, hops, maple, apple), it is important to understand the factors that contribute to their abundance…

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Unseasonably cool and wet conditions have delayed the start of VegNet this year. Because insects are poikilotherms, their development is directly related to temperature. Some insects are also reliant on adequate moisture. The percentage of armyworm eggs that hatch, for example. We certainly have had ‘adequate’ moisture this spring (!), which could mean more armyworm pressure into the summer and fall.

The NRFC (a NOAA program) produces monthly summary statistics and predictions. Click the image to access their website. TEMP refers to the deviation from historical normal (degrees F), and PRECIP is measured in percent normal.
Both May and June were abnormally cool and wet in Western Oregon.

cutworm moths on a round screen with muddy background
Trapping 50+ moths…in just 3 days… and it’s only May…is…concerning!

Peridroma saucia is common in Oregon. But for the past three years, we are detecting them at much higher-than-normal levels in early spring.

The graph below shows pheromone trap counts (# of adult moths per day) in recent years vs. a long term average. Please note that all data points before May 10th are NOT regional averages. They represent only the Corvallis location. These 5 single-location data points are filled with a dot pattern (hard to see, sorry). However, in 2020, the true regional average (peach diamonds) remained higher than normal until June 1st.

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NEW!

Do you grow Asparagus, Beans, Chickpeas, or any other minor/specialty crop of the alphabet? If so.. it’s YOUR TURN to provide input about the recent regulation of chlorpyrifos and how it will affect your production. Sorry, no gift card for this one, but YOUR VOICE IS IMPORTANT!

This survey is VERY SHORT (5 questions total!) and responses remain anonymous. Please consider filling out the survey, regardless of your perceived impact – we need to hear from everyone!

Thank you – Dani Lightle and Jessica Green

Please use the link below to CONTRIBUTE FOR: minor crops

https://beav.es/U6w

A new study from WSU indicates that peas respond to herbivore damage differently depending on if they are attacked by pea weevil or pea aphid first. Transmission of the pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is also affected. These biologically relevant interactions have implications for management. A very interesting study, well done, Cougs! https://news.wsu.edu/2021/08/10/pest-attack-order-changes-plant-defenses/