NEW!

Do you grow Asparagus, Beans, Chickpeas, or any other minor/specialty crop of the alphabet? If so.. it’s YOUR TURN to provide input about the recent regulation of chlorpyrifos and how it will affect your production. Sorry, no gift card for this one, but YOUR VOICE IS IMPORTANT!

This survey is VERY SHORT (5 questions total!) and responses remain anonymous. Please consider filling out the survey, regardless of your perceived impact – we need to hear from everyone!

Thank you – Dani Lightle and Jessica Green

Please use the link below to CONTRIBUTE FOR: minor crops

https://beav.es/U6w

A new study from WSU indicates that peas respond to herbivore damage differently depending on if they are attacked by pea weevil or pea aphid first. Transmission of the pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is also affected. These biologically relevant interactions have implications for management. A very interesting study, well done, Cougs! https://news.wsu.edu/2021/08/10/pest-attack-order-changes-plant-defenses/

The natural enemy of my enemy is my friend! We start seeing increased activity of beneficial insects this time of year. Everyone can identify a ladybug, a select few know what a lacewing looks like, but did you know that certain flies, beetles, and even yellowjackets also help to regulate pest populations?

CLICK TO VIEW a newly revised OSU Extension publication about natural enemies

READ RELATED POSTS here on the blog

and GO OUT and look on crops, wildflowers, and weeds (especially wild carrot right now) to see these “good guys” in action!

Doesn’t seem possible but we are in week 7 of the 2021 monitoring season. It has been a slow and rather uneventful start, compared to recent years, but predictions of extreme summer heat and drought could change that.

  • Data tables are available for week 6 and week 7
  • Looper levels remain VERY low
  • An early (Apr-May) boom of cabbage white butterfly means greenworms could be present in gardens and fields – scout accordingly
  • Aphid scouting will once again be part of VegNet’s regional monitoring effort. See the aphid profile page for more info
  • Subscribe to receive weekly program updates via email – and thanks for your interest!
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Three years ago, my field season was so affected by yellowjackets (FIG. 1) that I decided to find out what I could learn about them. Their abundance, activity, what influences populations, etc. It was actually harder than I thought to find information! This was noted by a 2018 paper , where the team investigated 908 published papers over almost 40 years and yep – less than 3% of them were wasp-related (FIG. 2).

Despite the importance of both taxa, bees are universally loved whilst wasps are universally despised.”

Seirian Sumner et al., 2018
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While none of us have a crystal ball, especially in agriculture, I thought it might be fun to offer some thoughts / warnings of how this year might look for insect pests of vegetables. I predict* ……

  • “Flea beetles will be rampant.” In the spring, adult flea beetles emerge from overwintering, and are already causing some problems in radish. We’ve been told by both local and regional sources that it’s going to be a hot and dry summer = flea beetles’ favorite weather. I suggest early and often scouting in brassica crops. Starting now, begin to scout weedy areas around fields. Once the crop emerges, or shortly after transplanting, focus efforts on field edges. It may be necessary to scout daily – yes, daily. Be aware that these insects are easily disturbed (they jump), sticky traps placed ~10″ off the ground can help assess activity – place them near edges. You’ll recognize the distinctive ‘pitting’ on cotyledons and true leaves. Check stems for signs of damage as well, just above the soil surface. For more information, see the flea beetle pest profile page.

  • “Wireworms are a cryptic foe we should get to know.” They are a common problem in grass and potato production. Adult click beetles do not live for very long and do not cause damage. Larvae (wireworms), on the other hand, live for 2-6 years and damage can be extensive. Before planting, especially if you are coming out of a grass rotation, take my advice and place a few bait traps to assess larval activity. Instructions and more information is available at the wireworm pest profile page.

  • “Every other year, cabbage loopers cause fear.” Ok, I admit, this one is just a stretch to fit the rhyme scheme. However, it is true that in the Willamette Valley, we have had major looper outbreaks in 2017 and 2019… so 2021 is a possibility. Trap count data will be available soon.

* PLEASE NOTE: these are merely educated guesses. In fact, part of the fun of monitoring insects is that they are truly so unpredictable!

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I mentioned in last week’s newsletter that the Oregon Dept of Agriculture (ODA), Washington State Dept of Agriculture (WSDA), and Washington State University (WSU) are all active in their efforts to prevent and detect Japanese beetles in the region. Remember:

  • This Thursday, April 1st, at 9am, WSU/WSDA is offering a webinar. Click here to register and learn more.

Also be sure to check out the OSU Extension publication that includes information on identification, life cycle and scouting, damage, control measures, and how to report a suspected Japanese beetle. EM 9158    Published April 2017 4 pages https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/em9158

NEW!

Do you grow Asparagus, Beans, Chickpeas, or any other minor/specialty crop of the alphabet? If so.. it’s YOUR TURN to provide input about the recent regulation of chlorpyrifos and how it will affect your production. Sorry, no gift card for this one, but YOUR VOICE IS IMPORTANT! This survey is VERY SHORT (5 questions total!) and responses remain anonymous. Please consider filling out the survey, regardless of your perceived impact – we need to hear from everyone! Thank you – Dani Lightle and Jessica Green

Please use the link below to CONTRIBUTE FOR: minor crops

https://beav.es/U6w


Continue reading